Explaining the 1831 census of Lübeck, Germany

We have quite a gap between the 1815 census I told you about the last time and this one from 1831.

And as you can see in the image below, the 1831 census form is a lot simpler and less detailed than the ones before.

The 1831 census goes back to only listing citizens within the town walls. It contains the following volumns:

  • volumn 01: Maria Magdalenen Quartier I
  • volumn 02: Maria Magdalenen Quartier II
  • volumn 03: Maria Magdalenen Quartier III
  • volumn 04: Maria Magdalenen Quartier IV
  • volumn 05: Maria Magdalenen Quartier V
  • volumn 06: Marien Quartier I
  • volumn 07: Marien Quartier II
  • volumn 08: Marien Quartier III
  • volumn 09: Marien Quartier IV
  • volumn 10: Marien Quartier V
  • volumn 11: Marien Quartier VI
  • volumn 12: Marien Quartier VII
  • volumn 13: Marien Quartier VIII
  • volumn 14: Marien Quartier XI
  • volumn 15: Marien Quartier XII
  • volumn 16: Johannis Quartier
  • volumn 17: Jacobi Quartier

This looks like a lot, but if you take a closer look at the single volumns you can see that each one is only between 10 and 30 pages. The census can be found at ancestry.com or familysearch.org.

To make this blogpost better comparable to the previous ones, I kept the first page of the Maria-Magdalenen-Quartier as an example.

1830 census Lübeck, Germany

1830 census Lübeck, Germany

The very first row, even above the header provides the name of the registrar taking the census on the left (in this case: A.F. Naht) and the name of the street and number of the house on the right (in this case: Mengstrasse No. 45).

I numbered the columns again:

  1. name of the street
  2. this “no”, meaning number just provides the consecutive number
  3. name of the head of the household
  4. occupaction of the head of the household
  5. there is no header for this column. My GUESS: number of adults, meaning of the head of the household was married
  6. number of children. You see, there is no differentiation between sons and daughters like there was in previous censuses
  7. number of male servants
  8. number of female servants
  9. total number of people living in the household
  10. remarks

Let’s take a look at row no. 2 as an example: Joh. Croll lives at Mengstrasse 45. He is a merchant, and according to my guess he is married. He has one child living in the household and three female servants, adding up the total number of people living in house to 6 (including him).

I hope this series helps you with your research in my hometown.

How to read the 1815 census for Lübeck, Germany

I am moving on with the resources I use. This blogpost will describe the 1815 census for Lübeck, Germany.

It is the first one which includes not only the inner city districts but also the parts outside of the town walls and other Lübeck territories in the area. Below you find the areas per volume. Highlighted in blue are those which contain information from outside of the town walls.

  • volume 1: Landwehr-Bezirk Holstheintor
  • volume 2: Landwehr-Bezirk Ritzerau
  • volume 3: Jacobi-Quartier
  • volume 4: Maria-Magdalena-Quartier
  • volume 5: Marien-Quartier
  • volume 6: Landwehr-Bezirk Mühlenthor
  • volume 7: Landwehr-Bezirk Burgthor
  • volume 8: Landwehr-Bezirk Travemünde

This is also the first census where my family comes into the pictures. Schlutup, the area where my family lived belongs to the colume 7: Landwehr-Bezirk Burgthor.

I stick to the first page of the census for the Marien-Quartier like in the last postings introducing Lübeck censuses. Just to make it easier to compare A reminder: so far the Marien-Quartier was the first volume, here it is volume 5.

1815 census Lübeck - Marien Quartier page 1

1815 census Lübeck – Marien Quartier page 1

The content is slightly different, although the form looks familiar. I numbered the columns to make it easier to follow:

  1. name of the street
  2. provides the number of the house, barrack or cellar
  3. the number of the corridor. A little explanation: When the houses in the front didn’t provide enough space anymore, barracks, booths and small cottages have been built in the back. Those were connected (and still are) via corridors. A collection of pictures can be found here.
  4. name of the head of the household. The number 1 next to the name means the person was single, number 2 provides the information that the head of the household was married
  5. occupation and profession
  6. lists the number of sons living in the household
  7. provides the number of daughters living in the household
  8. lists the number of male apprentices
  9. provides number of male assistents
  10. provides the number of female housekeepers and lady’s companions
  11. here we come to the male servants and
  12. female servants
  13. number of male family members or other related people in the household
  14. number of female family members or other related people in the household
  15. is just the addition of all listed members so far
  16. name of people who are living in the household but do not belong to the family
  17. their occupation
  18. and the number of people who are living in the household but do not belong to the family
  19. the form terminates with a column for written remarks.

Let’s have a look at row 40 in this example.

J.C. Dimpker lives in the Mengstrasse 40. He is married hatter and has one son and one daughter living with him and his wife, who is not named. He also has 2 male assistants and one female servant living in the household. Which adds up to 7 people living in the household.

I hope this helps to find your way around.

 

How to read the 1812 census of Lübeck, Germany

In some of my previous posts I started describing the sources available online which were really helpful for my research.

You can see  the full list (status quo) so far here.

Today I go on with the 1812 census of Lübeck, Germany. It is the second oldest census available online via ancestry.com or myheritage.de (disclaimer: I don’t work or am associated with either one of them) following the one from 1807.

If you have read the 1807 blogpost you will recognize this format. But the 1812 form shows slight changes.

Like the 1807 census the 1812 one is divided into the volumes for the quarters (quartier) of the historical inner city:

  • Volume 1: Marien Quartier
  • Volume 2: Johannis Quartier
  • Volume 3: Jacobi Quartier
  • Volume 4: Maria-Magdalena Quartier

To be comparable I chose the same page as for the 1807 blogpost. It is the first page of the first volume (Marien Quartier).

Lübeck census 1812

Lübeck census 1812

And here the content of the columns from left to right:

  • column 1: “Straße”  – the name of the street
  • columns 2 and 3: “Wohnung” – the second column provides the number of the house, barrack or cellar – the third column provides the number of the corridor. A little explanation: When the houses in the front didn’t provide enough space anymore, barracks, booths and small cottages have been built in the back. Those were connected (and still are) via corridors. A collection of pictures can be found here.
  • the column 4 is a bit different – well, it is SUPPOSED to be a bit different. Here the name of the head of the household and of ALL other inhabitants should have been listed. But if you take a look at the first entry, you see only “C.G. Martini et Frau” which means “C.G. Martini and wife” and when we come to the further columns you’ll see that they have not only children but also domestics and servants living with them which are not named here.
  • column 5: occupation and profession
  • columns 6, 7 and 8: here the information about the children is a bit more detailed than in the 1807 census. You see in columns 6 and 7 a distinction for the sons regarding their age. Column six shows the number of sons younger than 15 and in column 7 the number of sons older than 15. Daugthers are just shown in one figure in column 8.
  • columns 9 and 10: these columns provide information on the number of siblings and other relatives living in the household (male and female)
  • columns 11, 12 and 13: number of domestics – column 11 male apprenctises, column 12 male assistants and column 13 female housekeepers or lady’s companions
  • columns 14 and 15: number of servants (male and female)
  • column 16: the total number of family or other related people in the household
  • column 17: written remarks

What we are missing in this census compared to the one from 1807 is the information on people who are living in the household but do not belong to the Family. That totally vanished.. unfortunately.

 

 

 

March 22 – Maria Elisabeth Dorothea Kruse

The German Parliament decides to lower the age of majority from 21 to 18 on March 22, 1975.

At the bombardment of Frankfurt am Main on March 22, 1944 the gothic inner city was almost completely destroyed. 1001 people died that day.

Let’s see what we have on my family tree.

Maria Elisabeth Dorothea KRUSE is born on March 22, 1840 in Upahl, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany. She was the oldest of four children born into the marriage of the fee farmer Joachim Heinrich KRUSE and his wife Anna Catharina Maria née BAUMANN.

On November 6, 1863 she married the farmer Johann Joachim Heinrich KÖRNER from Upahl in Diedrichshagen, the main village of the parish.

The 1867 census shows her living with her husband, his parents and his siblings on the KÖRNER family farm in Upahl.

1867 census

1867 census

This is one census form you have to be careful again (for a detailed description on how to read the 1867 census, take a look here):

Lines 1 and 2 are the head of the household (father of Johann) and his wife. Lines 3 and 4 is Johann and Maria. Lines 5, 6, and 7 are siblings of Johann. But take a look at lines 8 and 9. In line 12 where the relationship to the head of the household is stated, both are given as daughters (“Tochter”). From the birthyears I was in doubt from the beginning because it would have meant that both of them were abt. 35 years younger than Johann.

But as you can see from the birthyears from Johann in line 3 and the women stated as wife (“Ehefrau”), she can clearly not be Johann’s mother, she would have been only eleven years old giving birth to him. She must be his stepmother.

So although very rare, it could have been that the two girls in the lines 8 and 9 would have been Johann’s baby sisters.

But it turned out (proven by other records) that those two girls are in truth two of the three children I found so far for Johann and Maria.

Again, I stretch it – read your documents carefully and with common sense

But coming back to Maria.

The 1900 census shows her already being widowed, still living in Upahl.

She died on September 11, 1911 in Upahl and got laid to rest on the chuch cemetary of Diedrichshagen on September 15, 1911.

How to read the 1807 census for Lübeck, Germany

Do you research in Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany? If yes, the online available censuses are really helpful with your research.

Available (e.g. at ancestry.com) are the censuses for the following years:

  • 1807
  • 1812
  • 1815
  • 1831
  • 1845
  • 1851
  • 1857
  • 1862
  • 1871
  • 1875
  • 1880

This blogpost explains how to read the first one from 1807.

census 1807 Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

census 1807 Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

The 1807 census is divided into the volumes for the quarters (quartier) of the historical inner city:

  • Volume 1: Marien Quartier
  • Volume 2: Johannis Quartier
  • Volume 3: Jacobi Quartier
  • Volume 4: Maria-Magdalena Quartier

The page above is the first one from the first volume (Marien Quartier). The columns from left to right:

  • first column: “Straße”  – the name of the street
  • second and third column: “Wohnung” – the second column provides the number of the house, barrack or cellar – the third column provides the number of the corridor. A little explanation: When the houses in the front didn’t provide enough space anymore, barracks, booths and small cottages have been built in the back. Those were connected (and still are) via corridors. A collection of pictures can be found here.
  • fourth column: name of the head of the household and if he (in very rare cases a she) was married, single or widower (widow)
  • fifth column: occupation and profession
  • sixth and seventh column: number of children in the household (boys and girls)
  • eighth til tenth column: number of domestics – column 8 male apprenctises, column 9 male assistants and column 10 female housekeepers or lady’s companions
  • column eleven and twelve: number of servants (male and female)
  • column thirteen and fourteen: number of siblings living in the household (male and female)
  • column fifteen: the total number of family or other related people in the household

The section on the right provides information about people who are living in the household but do not belong to the family

  • columns 16-18: locals: name, occupation and profession, number of people
  • columns 19-21: foreigners: name, occupation and profession, number of people
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